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HTML 5 Rollover for Retail

HTML 5 Rollover for Retail

HTML 5 provides simple and elegant features perfect for retail catalogs and circulars. Selecting HTML 5 as your primary viewer will provide a matching presentation for your digital solution across desktops and mobile browsers. Readers have the freedom to access all the information they want without having to click two or three times to get to it. What is it? Clear zoom to closely view the product Viewers access desired information in one simple rollover box Scrollable description allows you to exceed the former limit of 500 characters Customers can build a printable and shareable shopping list Adding a “Buy Now” button allows customers to make quick and easy purchases online The reader stays close to the content How does it benefit my publication? Creating a clean and efficient presentation allows readers and customers to easily make shopping lists making their shopping experience even greater. For an in-depth look at how digital catalogs and circulars can improve the value of your marketing and outreach, we invite you to read our case study. View and share this Tech Flies as a digital edition. We welcome you to view this piece and other Toad...
New Contents and Library View for HTML 5

New Contents and Library View for HTML 5

BlueToad’s HTML 5 viewer continues to improve. Did you know that phone views of our HTML 5 viewer are the quickest growing segment of page views on the BlueToad Platform? Recognizing this growing trend, BlueToad is proud to announce several updates to the HTML 5 viewer. These updates are designed to enhance both the reading and navigation experience for your digital edition on desktop and mobile devices. 1. New Contents View: Clicking on the contents icon from the toolbar in HTML 5 will now take the reader to a more convenient and mobile-friendly content screen containing: A scrollable article list with links to the text version of the content and to the laid out page on which the article exists; and Easy swipe navigation to other associated documents or issues in your library. 2. New Library View:  Archive content within your document’s library has been moved to a more convenient scrollable location at the bottom of the screen. 3. Default Start Page Settings:  In your dashboard you will have the ability to set the default start screen your readers see when first entering the digital edition. This default start screen can be set to the traditional page view, the new Contents View, or the new Library. You can even make these settings different for phone readers, who might prefer the text articles in the Contents View, than for other readers who might prefer the traditional page view. These updates to BlueToad’s HTML 5 contents and library view provide users with a better reading experience on a multitude of devices and improved navigation within and between your...
Native vs. Non-native digital solutions

Native vs. Non-native digital solutions

The following is a blog post from our President and CEO, Paul DeHart, written for Talking New Media, a news, information, and commentary website for the digital publishing industry. Wednesday column: Which digital strategy is best for your title: native or non-native? by Paul DeHart Each Wednesday, Talking New Media invites digital publishing leaders to discuss industry topics, or explain and demonstrate the latest solutions involving digital media. This week’s columnist is Paul DeHart, CEO and President of BlueToad.  This is the conundrum confronting many publishers who offer digital versions of their content.  Offering both options to our customers and having handled thousands of publications on both platforms simultaneously, we at BlueToad have unique, nonpartisan perspective on the question. Within the publishing industry, there are just as many ambassadors of native-only solutions as there are of non-native and hybrid solutions. With so many conflicting opinions, publishers remain confused and uncertain. To help gain clarity on the question, publishers may want to look beyond the inherent advantages and short comings of each platform and focus their efforts on developing a digital strategy that takes into account the entire content consumption journey.   As a result of mobile technology, a consumer’s content consumption journey may begin on one device and end on another. Readers often use phones to browse and “taste” content.  Laptops and desktops are still used to engage more fully with content while working.  Tablets and print are great for consumption while traveling, on the couch, or in bed.  Over the course of this journey, many devices and platforms might play a role in the big-picture consumption of content. For example,...

Native Apps “Versus” HTML5 (Part 2)

What are the pros and cons of using either environment for tablet and smartphone publishing? By John Parsons In Part 1, I explored some of the strengths and weaknesses of using native apps for content publishing. The browser approach has a different impact, but neither “side” is categorically better or worse for publishing professionals. The HTML5 Approach HTML5 is not all that mysterious. It’s simply the latest version of the markup language for rendering human-readable content on the Web. Managed by a working group of the W3C (www.w3.org), the not-yet-official standard will address a host of functional and aesthetic issues common to Web sites using HTML 4.01 and XHTML. For publishers, it represents an improvement in visual layout quality over ordinary HTML. Combined with CSS 3 (another pending Web standard), JavaScript, and Web fonts, HTML5 will provide greater typographic flexibility and control. Like previous versions, HTML5 is highly flexible and can re-flow at multiple screen sizes. It is also central to the “responsive design” trend on the Web, allowing content to be designed once, and then dynamically re-sized and even reformatted using CSS 3, to display well on any device. Unlike its predecessor, HTML5 includes native support for audio, video, and other elements previously supported by plugins like Flash. There are video file format issues still under discussion, but these will be ironed out as the standard evolves. A very important strength of HTML5 is its ability to handle constantly changing, need-to-know information. While this can potentially be done in an app—using a browser-like window or as a transparent overlay—a browser environment is often better suited for publishing live, constantly...

Native Apps “Versus” HTML5 (Part 1)

What are the pros and cons of using either environment for tablet and smartphone publishing? By John Parsons Many pixels have been spilled (including a few by this writer) over the strategic pros and cons of native apps and browser-based, HTML5 content for publishing. In fact, there is no “war”—no clear either/or distinction—between these two approaches. However, there are basic advantages and disadvantages to each, which content publishers should consider as they plan their long term mobile strategy. When Apple introduced the iPad, a mere 36 months ago, publishers scrambled to put something on these “new” portable devices. App content ranged from enhanced digital facsimiles to complex (and often very expensive) multimedia projects. Eventually, digital edition providers and developers began to offer tools for creating native content apps. Meanwhile, since tablets and smartphones already have built-in browsers, many began to consider publishing their content outside the native app environment, using the emerging HTML5 and CSS 3 standards to create an attractive, interactive publication. In theory, both approaches can be handled by a publisher’s internal staff: by the print design team in the case of apps or the Web design team in the case of HTML5. Not many have the resources to do both. Clearly, we need a new type of service provider—one that can offer both approaches, and does them equally well, at a reasonable price. Native Apps Skip ahead if you are familiar with tablet or smartphone apps, which are simply programs, like Word for Windows or MacOS. App developers use a Software Development Kit (SDK) and a programming language to create a user interface and various functions...